Awareness: a changing climate

Awareness: a quick look into Japan’s changing climate

I have been thinking about the best way to go into detail about Japan’s changing climate. I do realize that this is a global issue, but sometimes an abstract idea like a global environment is a bit too hard to understand. So instead, please look at the picture below: it says more than I ever could.

The headline simply reads “there’s no snow”.
From the Asahi-Shinbun dated 22/01/2020

Japan is an extremely long country starting north of the equator and leading up to the Arctic- it has a vast and varied climate and each prefecture can almost be seen to be its own sub-climate. Hyogo Prefecture is known for snow sports- or should that read was known for snow sports? The long lonely strip of snow is not a ‘freak of nature’, it is an import.

Imported snow- in an effort to keep afloat an economy based on winter sports. Did you also see the ski lift? There’s not much use in that now is there. Imported snow not only moves resources from one place to another, but there are high economical and carbon costs associated with this as well.

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The lack of cold temperatures has also been felt in Hokkaido especially in the run up to the Snow festival or Yuki-matsuri. Snow has been imported as well due to the warmer than usual winter. According to the JMA (Japanese metrological agency), Hokkaido has only received 48% of the expected snow fall a fall of 52% from the previous year.

Climate change is indeed happening and it is happening extremely quickly. This change has been reflected in the forthcoming Olympics as well. Due to exceptionally high temperatures in summer 2019, the marathon has been moved to Sapporo City, Hokkaido. On a more anadoctial front, I recorded temperatures as high as 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (ca. 38 degree Celsius) in the shade this summer in Iga- and I was not alone with seeing such temperatures.

Across Japan and even the world, record numbers of people were hospitalized due to heat related problems. Currently, one just needs to look at Australia- where they have at times run out of colours to use on heat charts due to the heat. If you need a bit more, conditions have been perfect for the wildfires which have caused complete devastation in places and the true costs of these fires (socially, environmentally, economically, ecologically etc) will possibly never truly be known.

There is a lot one can do but if business do not reflect personal effort i.e. a person becomes incredibly green but the business they work for either doesn’t change or becomes more environmentally damaging, nothing much will change. According to the wolves of Wall Street “Greed is good”, but what will greed do once the planet is uninhabitable?

Last quick note on this, there is an increasing difference on the amount of rice needing to be produced and the amount of rice being eaten. We are already seeing signs of troubles to come. Please do you part- even if it just a small action, it can and it does add up.

Thank you for reading and happy exploring.

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COPD in Japan

Idamichi

COPD is finally getting the awareness that it needs in Japan. It a problem that the rest of the world is aware of but Japan liked to bury its head. Quick note, why the pretty picture? You’ll need something nice to look at.

The lack of foresight about COPD within Japan was made apparent by the “COPD awareness campaign” advertisements that have appeared in my newspaper recently. What is strange about this is the Victorian impression Japan gives to “curing” diseases but nothing (much) on treatment or prevention.

When I say a Victorian impression- I do mean this literally. In all Japanese newspapers, there is at least 5 companies offering a special product that will help cure X, or help alleviate Y or further improve the quality of life regarding Z. A lot of this comes from the mix of eastern (or Chinese) medicine and western medicine.

I am aware that communities and tribes in Africa, in Asia and south America use traditional medicine. However, Japanese law requires companies to list the ingredients used in the ‘miracle cure’ and most ingredients are either common plant extracts or vitamins and minerals so are mostly useless.

COPD, however, seems to be an unknown concept as the newspaper gives not only the kanji (with the entire reading), not only the international name (COPD), not only some causes behind the disease but the effects it has and where to find additional information- highly unusual for Japan. Kanji reading, for example, are expected to be known by the reader as you are an educated, respected person of culture (again Victorian in attitude). Moving on.

COPD is 慢性閉塞性肺疾患 「mann/sei/hei/soku/sei/hai/shik/kann」. The kanji used (as a quick side note) is fantastic. The Kanji is literally:chronic (first 2 kanji), closed, obstruct, lungs, rapid, disease. But is this a good translation?

COPD 101

COPD is Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease- so the kanji use is quite good. I imagine it comes from either a translation of a western term either recently or just after the collapse of the Tokugawa shogunate. The term is used to describe multiple similar conditions that cause limitation in lung airflow- which is an extremely basic definition of COPD (but this is a blog about cultures not medicine) and even though I am studying medical science I’ll keep it there (which is extremely painful).

COPD is caused (primarily) by smoking, indoor pollutants (the main cause in low-economically developed countries around the world, and cleaning products. Japan has seemingly discovered that smoking is harmful and with the ease of getting cigarettes, there are waking up to a wider problem.

The current campaign is focused on awareness. The advertisements I have seen are the COPD awareness strategies which are ideas like: increasing the warning label on cigarettes, letting people know smoking causes COPD.

But why has Japan been forced to acknowledge this? According to a national survey on the http://www.copd-jp.com, there are over 5.3 million people aged 40 and over that have a COPD and 2.1 million of those are over 70.

People with COPD need to be aware of every activity they would like to do that day (especially in later stages) and elderly people that have advanced COPD may require more help and in a country that has a rapidly aging population, there is immense strain (already) on the health care system.

What can you do about it? Firstly be aware of what COPD is and how to reduce your change of contracting it. COPD is a progressive disease Daily management of the disease is ensuring that you lead a healthy lifestyle.

What does Japan need to do? Simply put, change its’ attitude. Japan is changing and some old culturally accepted practices (smoking for example) are no longer as acceptable as they once where. I just hope that Japan is able to change sooner and avoid a major future problem rather than face additional millions of suffers and try to find a care solution.

On the first day of December I talk about COPD morbidity. Merry Christmas?

Thank you for reading and happy exploring.


Final note, there are still adverts for cigarettes in Newspapers as well as the COPD awareness campaign. This is case and point why awareness in English as well as Japanese is needed and warranted.

Ride the Noble Prize wave

Japan continues to ride the Nobel prize wave

The door to science, a feature of Asahi Newspaper

Japan’s interest in science and technology has always been at the forefront of reporting and a key highlight of day time talk shows. However, what I found interesting was this piece on the history of batteries and the explanation as to why the Nobel prize was such a deserved one.

The picture above accompanied the article its self and if you can, please do read the article. It’s an extremely interesting explanation of a seemingly boring subject: batteries. The thing that we are using but never take note unless there is a problem.

The most famous problem was the lithium-ion batteries that were exploding due to it overheating. Interesting fact: the explosions and spontaneous combustion was not caused by the lithium in the battery but the chemical surrounding the cell is extremely flammable at high temperatures.

One of the key aspects of the article was the promotion of of the スマ―トホウス (smart house) concept, where individual homes fitted with solar panels generate and store energy for later use either in the home or to help charge one’s electric car.

One thing the article does mention is that the use of rechargeable products does help reduce CO2 emissions by up to half per household but it does not seem to take into account the CO2 produced at time of manufacture.

Japan will continue to ride the Nobel wave as there has been a Japanese laureates every year since 2014, in multiple fields, and it is likely to continue.

Thank you for reading and happy exploring.